Privacy on the Line

Скачать в pdf «Privacy on the Line»



Privacy on the Line


The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Article IV


United States Constitution


The evil incident to invasion of privacy of the telephone is far greater than that involved in tampering with the mails. Whenever a telephone line is tapped, the privacy of persons at both ends of the line is invaded, and all conversations between them upon any subject, and although proper, confidential and privileged, may be overheard. Moreover, the tapping of one man’s telephone line involves the tapping of the telephone of every other person whom he may or who may call him. As a means of espionage, writs of assistance and general warrants are but puny instruments of tyranny and oppression when compared with wire-tapping.

Justice Louis Brandeis


dissenting opinion in


Olmstead v. United States (277 U.S. 438, 1928, pp. 475-476)


Senator Herman Talmadge: Do you remember when we were in law school, we studied a famous principle of law that came from England and also is well known in this country, that no matter how humble a man’s cottage is, that even the King of England cannot enter without his consent.


Witness John Ehrlichman: I am afraid that has been considerably eroded over the years, has it not?

Скачать в pdf «Privacy on the Line»